search instagram arrow-down
Renegade Expressions

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,167 other followers

Follow Renegade Expressions on WordPress.com

Blog Stats

Top Posts

Recent Posts

Archives

Categories

Tags

2014 World Cup Africa Assassination Attractions Baltimore Birding Birds Black History Blogging Bob Marley Bombay Hook Cayman CB&W CFFC Challenge COB Conspiracy Cooking CWW Death Delaware Entertainment EPL Food Football History Injustice Jamaica Life Lifestyle Maryland Media Music Music History Nature Pennsylvania Peter Tosh Photography Poetry Predictions Premier League Reggae Relationships Shocking Soccer Sports Vegetarian Virginia Washington DC Weekly Photo Challenge

Blogs I Follow

Meta

Northern Cardinal

Male Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as the Redbird or Common Cardinal. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States from Maine to Texas and south through Mexico. It is found in woodlands, gardens, shrublands, and swamps.
The Northern Cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21–23 cm (8.3–9.1 in). It has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull reddish olive. The northern cardinal is mainly granivorous, but also feeds on insects and fruit. The male behaves territorially, marking out his territory with song. During courtship, the male feeds seed to the female beak-to-beak. A clutch of three to four eggs is laid, and two to four clutches are produced each year. It was once prized as a pet, but its sale as a cage bird was banned in the United States by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. [Wikipedia]

Female Northern Cardinal

Female Northern Cardinal

The male Northern Cardinal is perhaps responsible for getting more people to open up a field guide than any other bird. They’re a perfect combination of familiarity, conspicuousness, and style: a shade of red you can’t take your eyes off. Even the brown females sport a sharp crest and warm red accents. Cardinals don’t migrate, and they don’t molt into a dull plumage, so they’re still breathtaking in winter’s snowy backyards. In summer, their sweet whistles are one of the first sounds of the morning. [All About Birds]

IMG_1697

Pair of Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinal Facts [All About Birds]

  • Only a few female North American songbirds sing, but the female Northern Cardinal does, and often while sitting on the nest. This may give the male information about when to bring food to the nest. A mated pair shares song phrases, but the female may sing a longer and slightly more complex song than the male.
  • Many people are perplexed each spring by the sight of a cardinal attacking its reflection in a window, car mirror, or shiny bumper. Both males and females do this, and most often in spring and early summer when they are obsessed with defending their territory against any intruders. Birds may spend hours fighting these intruders without giving up. A few weeks later, as levels of aggressive hormones subside, these attacks should end (though one female kept up this behavior every day or so for six months without stopping).
  • The male cardinal fiercely defends its breeding territory from other males. When a male sees its reflection in glass surfaces, it frequently will spend hours fighting the imaginary intruder.
  • The oldest recorded Northern Cardinal was a female and was 15 years, 9 months old when she was found in Pennsylvania.

 

9 comments on “Northern Cardinal

  1. alabasterbeachgirl says:

    I saw a male and a female in my side yard yesterday. Looked like a little couple. They were very beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love these birds. I have been trying to photograph one for a while. I never dreamt I would photograph a pair. I won’t stop until I get a perfect shot.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. alabasterbeachgirl says:

        Yes, I was looking at them through a window and a screened in porch. I knew that if I ventured close enough to take a picture that I would make too much noise and scare them off so I just sat there and watched them. But would have loved to have gotten a picture. Good luck!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Amy says:

    How interesting! I get to see them out in the window. 🙂

    Like

    1. They are some interesting birds, the color difference between the males and females is pretty cool.

      Liked by 1 person

Express Yourself!
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Na kartce pisane

Myśli przelane na papier...

The Review Author

Book Reviews| Tiny tales(starting from 24)

Mugilan Raju

Prime my subconscious, one hint at a time

Off the UnevenPavement

Trust the wisdom of your soul,because it knows the way to your happiness༄

huggers.ca

SAVE SOMETHING!

Natural History Wanderings

Sandy Steinman's Blog

Celestial Priestess's Fourth Density Journal

Metaphyics, Horoscopes, Personal Blog, Modeling & Recommended Products,

%d bloggers like this: