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Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

The Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), also known as The American Treecreeper, is a small songbird, the only North American member of the treecreeper family Certhiidae.

Adults are brown on the upperparts with light spotting, resembling a piece of tree bark, with white underparts. They have a long thin bill with a slight downward curve and a long stiff tail used for support as the bird creeps upwards. The male creeper has a slightly larger bill than the female. The brown creeper is 11.7–13.5 cm (4.6–5.3 in) long.
Its voice includes single very high pitched, short, often insistent, piercing calls; see, or swee. The song often has a cadence like; pee pee willow wee or see tidle swee, with notes similar to the calls. [Wikipedia]

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creepers are tiny woodland birds with an affinity for the biggest trees they can find. Look for these little, long-tailed scraps of brown and white spiraling up stout trunks and main branches, sometimes passing downward-facing nuthatches along the way. They probe into crevices and pick at loose bark with their slender, down-curved bills, and build their hammock-shaped nests behind peeling flakes of bark. Their piercing calls can make it much easier to find this hard-to-see but common species. [All About Birds]

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper Facts [All About Birds]

  • The naturalist W.M. Tyler, writing in 1948, captured this species’ energy and fragility in a memorable description, “The Brown Creeper, as he hitches along the bole of a tree, looks like a fragment of detached bark that is defying the law of gravitation by moving upward over the trunk, and as he flies off to another tree he resembles a little dry leaf blown about by the wind.”
  • Brown Creepers burn an estimated 4–10 calories (technically, kilocalories) per day, a tiny fraction of a human’s daily intake of about 2,000 kilocalories. By eating a single spider, a creeper gains enough energy to climb nearly 200 feet vertically.
  • Wildlife managers sometimes use the Brown Creeper as an indicator species to help gauge the effects of logging on wildlife habitat.
  • The oldest Brown Creeper on record was at least 5 years, 5 months old and was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in Illinois.

2 comments on “Brown Creeper

  1. Vivian Zems says:

    The details you put are are wonderful. I now know something new😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. That is my aim. ☺

      Liked by 1 person

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