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Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a member of the family Bombycillidae or Waxwing family of passerine birds. It is a medium-sized, mostly brown, gray, and yellow bird named for its wax-like wing tips. It is a native of North and Central America, breeding in open wooded areas in southern Canada and wintering in the southern half of the United States, Central America, and the far northwest of South America. Its diet includes cedar cones, fruit, and insects. [Wikipedia]

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

A treat to find in your binocular viewfinder, the Cedar Waxwing is a silky, shiny collection of brown, gray, and lemon-yellow, accented with a subdued crest, rakish black mask, and brilliant red wax droplets on the wing feathers. In fall these birds gather by the hundreds to eat berries, filling the air with their high, thin, whistles. In summer you’re as likely to find them flitting about over rivers in pursuit of flying insects, where they show off dazzling aeronautics for a forest bird. [All About Birds]

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing Facts [All About Birds]

  • The name “waxwing” comes from the waxy red secretions found on the tips of the secondaries of some birds. The exact function of these tips is not known, but they may help attract mates.
  • Cedar Waxwings with orange instead of yellow tail tips began appearing in the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada in the 1960s. The orange color is the result of a red pigment picked up from the berries of an introduced species of honeysuckle. If a waxwing eats enough of the berries while it is growing a tail feather, the tip of the feather will be orange.
  • Because they eat so much fruit, Cedar Waxwings occasionally become intoxicated or even die when they run across overripe berries that have started to ferment and produce alcohol.
  • The oldest recorded Cedar Waxwing was a male and at least 7 years, 1 month old when he was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in Maryland in 2014. He had been banded in the same state in 2008.
Cedar Waxwing in nest.

A Cedar Waxwing in its nest.

2 comments on “Cedar Waxwing

  1. rugby843 says:

    Loved these, although they were brighter colored. In Colorado every year they would flock into our Russian Olive tree and eat as many as they could. I’m surprised because the branches were full of thorns. The home we purchased there had all thorny bushes next to the house and this tree in the front yard. No, a witch didn’t live there, he was a lawyer!😂😂

    Liked by 1 person

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